Considering 70-80 percent of searchers only focus on organic results, according to MarTech, organic traffic is the best opportunity you have to grow your website traffic. A strong SEO strategy starts by understanding what your buyers are most likely to search for. You probably already have a good idea of what that is, but the data might surprise you. For instance, let’s say you sell accounting software. Plenty of people search for that—more than 12,000 a month, according to SEMrush—so naturally, you want to rank on the first page of Google for that term.

Headlines are one of the most important parts of your content. Without a compelling headline, even the most comprehensive blog post will go unread. Master the art of headline writing. For example, the writers at BuzzFeed and Upworthy often write upward of twenty different headlines before finally settling on the one that will drive the most traffic, so think carefully about your headline before you hit “publish.”
Optimise for your personas, not search engines. First and foremost, write your buyer personas so you know to whom you’re addressing your content. By creating quality educational content that resonates with you>r ideal buyers, you’ll naturally improve your SEO. This means tapping into the main issues of your personas and the keywords they use in search queries. Optimising for search engines alone is useless; all you’ll have is keyword-riddled nonsense.
I really enjoyed your post, im building my own business from the ground up making custom furniture, lighting, and home decor. it took me a year to launch my website and now im trying to invite more traffic and ways for clients and interested parties to share my content and start buying my product. I liked the idea of Share triggers… im going to be incorporating that into my social media strategies. Any advice would go a long way. thanks again Brian
Look at your website traffic analytics for at least one full year. If your website is hosted on a content management system like HubSpot, it should be easy to spot trends in your website traffic. There may be some ebbs and flows if you have a seasonal aspect to your business, but a year’s worth of data will give you a baseline. It’s even better if you have several years’ worth of data so you can see year-over-year growth trends. If your traffic has been increasing about 10 percent from one year to the next, you know a 30 percent increase will be a challenge, but not impossible.
Hi Chris, "Good content" means a couple of things - good for readers and good for Google. Good content for readers means that the content answers questions, provides value, offers solutions, and is engaging. You want to keep the reader on the page and on your website for as long as possible. To make good content for Google, you have to provide the search engine with a set of signals - e.g., keywords, backlinks, low bounce rates, etc... The idea is that if you make good content for readers (engaging, valuable, actionable, and informative), your content will get more engagement. When your content gets more engagement Google will see it as good content too and put it higher in the SERPs. Making "good content" is about striking that balance. Let us know if that answered your question!
How? Well first of all, when Google or other search engines serve up your website in search results, they take signals from the words you use to try to deliver meaningful results to the searcher. This means you want to be quite strategic about the words that you choose – what is your target likely to be searching for? What words do you really want to rank for?
While with search advertising, you’re paying to show up in the top spot for relevant searches, with social media advertising you are paying to show up in relevant feeds. With both forms of advertising, you can specify the type of audience in front of which you’d like to appear, but with more psychographic data, social media offers superb targeting.
What this means is that if someone visits a website and is logged into their Google account, the site owner cannot see the search keywords they used to get there. This has resulted in a great deal of organic traffic being incorrectly marked as direct. The same thing happened to Apple iOS 6 users carrying out Google searches through the Safari browser, after the operating system’s privacy settings were changed, as Search Engine Land reports.
×