Direct traffic is defined as visits with no referring website. When a visitor follows a link from one website to another, the site of origin is considered the referrer. These sites can be search engines, social media, blogs, or other websites that have links to other websites. Direct traffic categorizes visits that do not come from a referring URL.
Google Analytics is free to use, and the insights gleaned from it can help you to drive further traffic to your website. Use tracked links for your marketing campaigns and regularly check your website analytics. This will enable you to identify which strategies and types of content work, which ones need improvement, and which ones you should not waste your time on.

Direct traffic is defined as visits with no referring website. When a visitor follows a link from one website to another, the site of origin is considered the referrer. These sites can be search engines, social media, blogs, or other websites that have links to other websites. Direct traffic categorizes visits that do not come from a referring URL.
Okay, so that gives you a sense of the general areas that your traffic will come from and how you should go about tracking your traffic. Remember, if you're not tracking the traffic that's coming to your website, you're wasting your time marketing online. When you drive traffic to any site, blog or wherever, you need to understand where it's coming from so that you can scale your efforts. 

Essentially, what distinguishes direct from organic traffic today is tracking. According to Business2Community, direct traffic is composed of website visits which have “no referring source or tracking information.” A referring source can be a search engine, or it can be a link from another website. Direct traffic can include visits that result from typing the URL directly into a browser, as the simple definition suggests.
I know some business owners that have had great success on Pinterest. You’ll want to make sure you have good visuals to go with each blog post – infographics are great for this – and make sure you’re posting at least 10 unique pins for every blog. Most importantly, Pinterest is a community just like any other social media, so make sure you’re active regularly, connecting with others in your niche, and re-pinning others’ pins.

You ever hear that phrase, “It’s easier sell gold than it is to sell shit”? No website starts out as minted gold right off the bat, so make sure you’re not trying to peddle, well…you know. In the beginning, a lot of websites try to create useful content on their blog for their audience but end up churning out all the same 500-1,000-word articles offering the 10 quick steps to achieving xyz. Not only is there no shortage of that content, it’s the last thing that’s going to make you stand out from the crowd and make a lasting impression.

Organic traffic, on the other hand, are those visits which are tracked by another entity — usually because they have arrived through search engines — but also from other sources. Hubspot’s definition emphasizes the term “non-paid visits,” because paid search ads are considered a category of their own. But this is where the lines between direct and organic start to get little blurry.

Your audience seeks out your content or is a regular consumer of your content. Website traffic to your property could be from your audience, but if you’re completely dependant on a 3rd party platform to send the traffic to your website, it may be the platform’s audience that you’re borrowing. (that’s something we talked about on Episode 47 of the Publisher Lab Podcast)


Great article as always. My wife is about to start a business about teaching (mainly) Mums how to film and edit little movies of their loved ones for posterity (www.lovethelittlethings.com launching soon). We have always struggled with thinking of and targeting relevant keywords because keywords like ‘videography’ and ‘family movies’ don’t really some up what she is about. Your article ties in with other learnings we have come across where we obviously need to reach out to right people and get them to share to get her product out there because purely focusing on keywords I don’t think will get us anywhere.
Hi , the post is really nice , and it made me think if our current strategy is ok or not , 2 things are important " High quality content strategy " and " Good quality Links " now joining those correctly can pose some real challenges , say if we have n no of content writers who are writing for couple of websites, to be generic let’s consider , 1 writer @ 1 website . We have to write make a content strategy for in-house blog of the website to drive authentic traffic on it and a separate content strategy for grabbing  links from some authentic High PR website i.e. CS should be 2 ways , In-house / Outhouse .
Find relevant Facebook Pages and Groups and start commenting and engaging with others. Don't spam. Don't promote. Not at first at least. But, comment and engage. Add value. Then, and only then, when the opportunity is right, direct them to a relevant piece of content on your site that would help add to the conversation. When done right, not only can you get the right eyeballs, but those prospects can quickly turn into customers.

Consider your industry. If you’re a niche metal manufacturer, you’re probably thrilled if your website gets 3,000 visitors a month. However, if you’re a national retailer, that number is a sure sign of trouble. Consider what’s realistic given the demand in your industry and your competition. Tools like Alexa and SEMrush will even show you website traffic estimates for your competitors.
Shopify’s website traffic checker reports help you understand how much traffic your store is getting. Under Reports, in the left menu of your Shopify store, you can browse “Sessions over time” and select specific dates to see how much website traffic you have. By cross-referencing this with other reports, such as “Online store conversion rate,” you’ll better understand if you’re getting traffic from your target audience.
Social media is one of the most popular free marketing tools around, and plays a role in driving traffic to your website. Use Facebook, Instagram, and LinkedIn to promote blog posts and other useful pages on your website. This way you can turn your social media audience into website visitors, and draw traffic from their networks if you post shareable content.

So just how much of the traffic that finds itself labeled as direct is actually organic? Groupon conducted an experiment to try to find out, according to Search Engine Land. They de-indexed their site for the better part of a day and looked at direct and organic traffic, by hour and by browser, to pages with long URLs, knowing that pages with shorter URLs actually do get a large amount of direct traffic, as they can be typed quickly and easily into a browser. The results showed a 50% drop in direct traffic, clearly demonstrating how all of these other factors come into play during the analytics process.
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