If you write online at all, then you probably know Q&A platform Quora. Quora is a fantastic place to find questions people are asking around your area of expertise. Write a great answer, share it socially to get some upvotes, and watch your traffic (and referrals!) soar. At this time of writing, we receive about 10,000 views a quarter on our answers and have received over 320,000 in the last few years:
So just how much of the traffic that finds itself labeled as direct is actually organic? Groupon conducted an experiment to try to find out, according to Search Engine Land. They de-indexed their site for the better part of a day and looked at direct and organic traffic, by hour and by browser, to pages with long URLs, knowing that pages with shorter URLs actually do get a large amount of direct traffic, as they can be typed quickly and easily into a browser. The results showed a 50% drop in direct traffic, clearly demonstrating how all of these other factors come into play during the analytics process.
Pinterest Promoted Pins have been the number one source of traffic to my new website, and they’re far cheaper than Facebook Ads for my audience. A small $5-10 per day budget has resulted in 1,127 clicks to my website in the last 30 days. The best part? Even once I stop running the promotions, my pins will still show where people have pinned them, so they’ll continue to drive traffic to my website
If your social media profiles contain a link to your website, then you’ve turned your engagement into another channel for website traffic. Just be sure to engage moderately and in a sincere way, and avoid including links to your website in your comments—lest you appear spammy and hurt your online and business reputation. Increased traffic should not be the goal of your engagement, but rather a secondary result.
What this means is that if someone visits a website and is logged into their Google account, the site owner cannot see the search keywords they used to get there. This has resulted in a great deal of organic traffic being incorrectly marked as direct. The same thing happened to Apple iOS 6 users carrying out Google searches through the Safari browser, after the operating system’s privacy settings were changed, as Search Engine Land reports.
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