You could hire an SEO expert, an advertising manager and an in-house videographer and hope you generate enough revenue to make up for their salaries. Or you could work with a marketing agency that has expertise in all three areas. An agency can quickly evaluate what’s working and what isn’t so you can shift gears more easily—for instance, redirecting some of your PPC spending to improve SEO and organic traffic.

Thanks for the comment, I would not say it is impossible to create high quality backlinks from scratch without content, you just need to do a review on competitor backlinks and see if their are any easy targets. We have had some good luck in the education space acquiring links on the same pages as competitor from PR5+ edu sites. It all revolves around the outreach strategy in which you put in place.
You probably already have a budget for a lot of these activities, so you may just need to reallocate some of your spending. For instance, maybe you already have an in-house writer who handles your company’s blog and social media. She has a basic understanding of SEO, but she’s not looking at search data to shape the editorial calendar. You saw a spike in organic traffic a few years ago when you launched the blog, but now it seems to have reached a plateau. To make up for the slow growth there, you’ve been investing a lot more in Google Ads. The ads help with visibility, but they’re not getting the conversions you want. You also want to create some professional looking videos, but the extent of your staff’s experience is using their iPhones to capture their dogs’ new tricks. 
This is one of my favorite ways to connect with other entrepreneurs like myself, chat with them, and usually learn quite a bit – I feature them on my podcast, The Side Hustle Project. I started the podcast as a way to feature thought leaders in my industry and learn about what it took for them to succeed in their side hustle – and it’s the perfect opportunity for content outreach too. When the podcast airs, most of them will share it with their audience.

Great article as always. My wife is about to start a business about teaching (mainly) Mums how to film and edit little movies of their loved ones for posterity (www.lovethelittlethings.com launching soon). We have always struggled with thinking of and targeting relevant keywords because keywords like ‘videography’ and ‘family movies’ don’t really some up what she is about. Your article ties in with other learnings we have come across where we obviously need to reach out to right people and get them to share to get her product out there because purely focusing on keywords I don’t think will get us anywhere.
I have always believed in good quality content, well structured and written in a way that isn’t just about promotional talk. Thanks for sharing this information with us, it’s always helpful to have everything written in a concise manner so we can remind ourselves now and again of what it takes to increase organic traffic. As an SEO consultant myself I come across websites all the time that are messy and still using tactics that have long been out of date. Having a successful website is all about quality content and links. I like it that you stated what the problem was and then how you fixed it for the client. Great article.
Thank you Brian. I am so brand spanking new to all this and i am really struggling with understanding it all. I have tried to read so many thing to help my website and this was the first article to really make sense however Being an urban, street menswear online store i feel like my niche is too broad?.. Ahh Feel like I am drowning maybe I need to do your course! Thanks again for the read I will be doing a lot more thats for sure
There are a lot of different avenues you can go with this one, and I’ve tried quite a few different methods. The first is finding related bloggers in your field and reaching out to see if they’ll accept a guest post from you – you’ll have to do a lot of trial and error with this, because you’ll get a lot of rejections, but reaching that new audience can really pay off.
Add relevant links back to your site. Throughout your answer, sprinkle a few relevant links back to your website. The more relevant they are to the question, the more clicks and traffic they will generate. You can also finish your answers with a link to your lead magnet, concluding with something like this: “Want to know more about how to start a business? Check out my free checklist with 10 steps for starting your first business!” and a link to the lead magnet (in this example, the checklist).
You probably visit at least a few sites that are relevant to your business on a regular basis, so why not join the conversation? Commenting doesn’t necessarily provide an immediate boost to referral traffic right away, but making a name for yourself by providing insightful, thought-provoking comments on industry blogs and sites is a great way to get your name out there – which can subsequently result in driving more traffic to your own site. Just remember that, as with guest posting, quality and relevance are key – you should be engaging with other people in your niche, not dropping spam links on unrelated websites.

In the early days of the web, site owners could rank high in search engines by adding lots of search terms to web pages, whether they were relevant to the website or not. Search engines caught on and, over time, have refined their algorithms to favor high-quality content and sites. This means that SEO is now more complex than just adding the right words to your copy.

The Featured Snippet section appearing inside the first page of Google is an incredibly important section to have your content placed within. I did a study of over 5,000 keywords where HubSpot.com ranked on page 1 and there was a Featured Snippet being displayed. What I found was that when HubSpot.com was ranking in the Featured Snippet, the average click-through rate to the website increased by over 114%.
The website traffic checker Alexa helps with competitive research. In other words, if you want to know what your competitors’ traffic sources are, this is the tool you can use. Plus, it’s free. I use this website traffic checker when building new stores to see what the main traffic sources of my competitors are. You can also use it to monitor the competition’s popularity – is the traffic trending upward, stable, or declining. You’ll even see the website’s global or national rank.
That’s true Thomas – this can happen when going after very competitive keywords. To avoid that you can just grab the first subpage you see ranking – subpages most of the time won’t have a lot of brand searches associated with them/you’ll see true topic value. It may be lower than normal, but in general can’t hurt to have a passive calculation when making arguments of what you might achieve.

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