Honestly, no one with any clout is going to allow you to appear on their podcast or write a guest piece for their blog if it doesn’t deliver value for their audience. Guest posting is a two-way street – the blog owner gets traffic to the content while the poster gets a link to their own website and the chance to get referral traffic back to their site from it. The reputation needs to be upheld by both players.
What this means is that if someone visits a website and is logged into their Google account, the site owner cannot see the search keywords they used to get there. This has resulted in a great deal of organic traffic being incorrectly marked as direct. The same thing happened to Apple iOS 6 users carrying out Google searches through the Safari browser, after the operating system’s privacy settings were changed, as Search Engine Land reports.
There were some great tips in this article. I notice that many people make the mistake of making too many distracting images in the header and the sidebar which can quickly turn people off content. I particularly dislike google ads anchored in the centre of a piece of text. I understand that people want to make a revenue for ads but there are right ways and wrong ways of going about this. The writing part of the content is the important part, why would you take a dump on it by pouring a load of conflicting media in the sides?
Yep and sometimes it’s just being a little creative. I’ve started a little blog on seo/wordpress just for fun actually… no great content on it like here though… but because the competition is so tough in these niches I decided to take another approach. I created a few WordPress plugins that users can download for free from wordpress.org… and of course these link to my site so this gets me visitors each day.

On the flipside, if your domain authority is in the 60s or 70s, your analysis isn’t about whether or not you can rank – you instead are trying to determine what keywords you can rank for without promotion, a nice luxury to have. In the 40s, you most likely don’t have that ability – every topic will require cold outreach in order to see the first page.


Consider your resources. If your website traffic has been increasing by 10 percent with blogging alone but you’re now going to start investing in pay-per-click (PPC) ads, you can expect an increase that correlates with the additional spend. If you’re a B2B company, you can expect about a 2.5 percent click-through rate for your ads. The cost of PPC ads is based on the keywords you’re bidding on, who else is bidding on them and how relevant your ads are (known as your quality score). A marketing agency with expertise in demand generation will be able to recommend a budget and set realistic expectations for website traffic based on that budget.


People find their way to your website in many different ways. If someone is already familiar with your business and knows where to find your website, they might just navigate straight to your website by typing in your domain. If someone sees a link to a blog you wrote in their Facebook newsfeed, they might click the link and come to your website that way.
To find the right people I downloaded a list of some of the most popular users within the community. To do this, I used Screaming Frog SEO Spider to gather a list of all the URLs on the website. I then exported this list into an Excel spreadsheet and filtered the URLs to only show those that were user profile pages. I could do this because all of the profile pages had /user/ within the URL.
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