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How can you get the context part right? It begins with planning topics that are a good fit for your customer personas and then aligning them with appropriate high and mid-volume keywords. As Content Marketing Institute discusses, be very careful not to “over” optimize – keyword stuffing or trying to rank for a keyword just because it has a lot of searches can backfire on you. Always keep that target audience in mind.
This is a crucial area. If you do not have schema markup and rel="author", you are costing your business money. It is as simple as that. As an example, say I want to make spaghetti (pasta) for dinner I search for “Spaghetti Recipe” and instantly I see some great markup in play, but one competitor has no markup and no rel="author" they are losing business in my eyes. Wouldn't you agree?.
Beyond organic and direct traffic, you must understand the difference between all of your traffic sources and how traffic is classified. Most web analytics platforms, like Google Analytics, utilize an algorithm and flow chart based on the referring website or parameters set within the URL that determine the source of traffic. Here is a breakdown of all sources:
One way to quickly increase your traffic is to go on a site like Wikipedia and search for broken links. Then, replace those broken links with quality content by first researching the old content using the Wayback Machine. Then, replace it with similar, high-quality content and contact the editor of the page to offer up yours as a replacement. It's not guaranteed, but when it works, it's powerful.
Tyler is an award-winning digital marketer, SEO veteran, successful start-up founder, and well-known publishing industry speaker. Tyler also serves as the host of Pubtelligence, a publishers-only event hosted at Google offices around the globe. Tyler describes his core competency as learning. He has composed content for some of the world’s top publications and has over a decade of experience building businesses in the digital space. Tyler is currently the Head of Marketing at Ezoic and serves as an SEO and marketing expert for start-up competitions across the U.S.
More than 1.9 billion people watch videos on YouTube every month, and 30 million of those are on the platform daily. Create a YouTube channel for your business and fill it with educational, fun, or how-to videos and you're likely to see a boost in website traffic as viewers click through to your site to learn more. You can also embed YouTube videos in the body of your website to keep visitors engaged once they get to your site.
It’s probably no surprise to see social media on this list. It’s an effective way to get more eyeballs on your content and tap into the personal networks of your existing fans. What may surprise you is the importance of hashtags. People have become increasingly picky about the content that they consume, which means they’re turning to hashtags as a way to streamline the influx. Smart use of hashtags enables you to precisely target your ideal customer and expand your reach beyond your existing audience.

“To give you an example, our domain authority is currently a mediocre 41 due to not putting a lot of emphasis on it in the past. For that reason, we want to (almost) automatically scratch off any keyword with a difficulty higher than 70%—we just can’t rank today. Even the 60% range as a starting point is gutsy, but it’s achievable if the content is good enough.”
Once you’ve attracted your customers to your site, whether to a piece of content via social or a conversion page via SEO, they’ll often leave your site and come back a few times before they actually convert. Sometimes they’re doing research, sometimes they get distracted by other sites, and sometimes they’re just not ready to buy or give you the information you so badly need from them to drive your business forward.
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