Search engine optimisation or SEO, has become a huge priority for marketers over the last few years. It’s easy to see why—higher search engine rankings result in more traffic, more leads, and higher sales and conversions. But how, exactly, does it work? How does adding keywords to various site elements improve your chances of ranking well in search engines?
Optimise for your personas, not search engines. First and foremost, write your buyer personas so you know to whom you’re addressing your content. By creating quality educational content that resonates with you>r ideal buyers, you’ll naturally improve your SEO. This means tapping into the main issues of your personas and the keywords they use in search queries. Optimising for search engines alone is useless; all you’ll have is keyword-riddled nonsense.
Your audience seeks out your content or is a regular consumer of your content. Website traffic to your property could be from your audience, but if you’re completely dependant on a 3rd party platform to send the traffic to your website, it may be the platform’s audience that you’re borrowing. (that’s something we talked about on Episode 47 of the Publisher Lab Podcast)

Competitions or drawings. I’ve worked with companies to send out postcards inviting people that have shown interest in the business/industry to enter to win. We’ve brought them to a unique page for the contest, and after entering, ensured that we had a CTA in the Confirmation that pushed them to the main site. Resulted in a 30% bump in traffic during the contest period and a 5% bump over time.
SEMRush has a relatively new feature that allows you to quickly see the highest-trafficked pages for a given domain. It’s a bit buried, so can be easy to miss, but it’s a no-brainer shortcut to quickly unveil the topics with massive traffic. Unfortunately it doesn’t immediately give you traffic or traffic cost, but one extra step will solve that for you.
The term “organic traffic” is used for referring to the visitors that land on your website as a result of unpaid (“organic”) search results. Organic traffic is the opposite of paid traffic, which defines the visits generated by paid ads. Visitors who are considered organic find your website after using a search engine like Google or Bing, so they are not “referred” by any other website.
Organic traffic is the primary channel that inbound marketing strives to increase. This traffic is defined as visitors coming from a search engine, such as Google or Bing. This does not include paid search ads, but that doesn’t mean that organic traffic isn’t impacted by paid search or display advertising, either positively or negatively. In general, people trust search engines, and sayings such as “just Google it” reinforce that humans are tied to the search engine. Thus, paid search, display, or even offline campaigns can drive searches, which may increase organic traffic while those campaigns are running.

Finding new ways to increase website traffic is critical for any business. In order for your business to grow, you need to continually bring new potential customers to your site. But developing strategies to accomplish this goal is not always easy.  How do we increase website traffic, exactly? What type of content will attract new website visitors? This article outlines the best ways to accomplish these goals so you can continue to grow your business.


For our client: We were lucky enough to remove most from the prior agency outreach, we also went directly to many webmasters in which we wanted to remove links. We did not use the Disavow tool as it was not around when we completed this link cleanup, but we all know it has been said that if you are going to use the Disavow Tool to use it with caution.
This means channels, like your social media, should be maximized – used to regularly promote your content, or variations of it rather than a “post once then forget” approach. Here at Ops Calendar, we’ve created features to automate this process, including “smart queues”, where social posts are scheduled out from the time your content publishes and “social loops”, a feature which ensures your posts get cycled on a recurring schedule.
Headlines are one of the most important parts of your content. Without a compelling headline, even the most comprehensive blog post will go unread. Master the art of headline writing. For example, the writers at BuzzFeed and Upworthy often write upward of twenty different headlines before finally settling on the one that will drive the most traffic, so think carefully about your headline before you hit “publish.”
Find relevant Facebook Pages and Groups and start commenting and engaging with others. Don't spam. Don't promote. Not at first at least. But, comment and engage. Add value. Then, and only then, when the opportunity is right, direct them to a relevant piece of content on your site that would help add to the conversation. When done right, not only can you get the right eyeballs, but those prospects can quickly turn into customers.
I’ve always been one to create great content, but now I see it may not necessarily be the right content. Can Share Triggers work for all niches including things like plumbing companies, computer repair, maybe even handy men that have a website for their business? I would say I’m estimating half the views a month as I should. Hopefully some of these strategies will help.
Now in your reconsideration request make sure you are honest and tell Google everything that the prior agency was up too. Be sure to include all Excel information of removed links and say you are going to make an ongoing effort to remove everything negative. It is common knowledge that Google may not accept your first reconsideration request, so it may take a few times.

I am the founder of Credo. I have 10 years of SEO and digital experience, across agencies and in-house, and have worked with some of the largest websites on the internet to drive growth. I live in Denver CO with my wife and dog. I am an entrepreneur, speaker, writer, skier, rock climber, and plan to visit every continent on Earth. You can find me on Twitter and LinkedIn.

For most online retailers, LinkedIn often seems like the last place you’d get traffic from. And while it might not be the biggest priority, you can still get a steady stream of traffic from this source. Most online retailers use LinkedIn to share their PR news. For example, if you recently donated to a charity, want to highlight an employee from your team, or achieved a big milestone for your business, you might share an article from your website on LinkedIn. Sharing product links is uncommon, unless the product is the first of its kind. Videos tend to do really well on LinkedIn in terms of views and engagement. By adding a link to your website in a post with a video, you could increase website traffic.


I am the founder of Credo. I have 10 years of SEO and digital experience, across agencies and in-house, and have worked with some of the largest websites on the internet to drive growth. I live in Denver CO with my wife and dog. I am an entrepreneur, speaker, writer, skier, rock climber, and plan to visit every continent on Earth. You can find me on Twitter and LinkedIn.

Headlines are one of the most important parts of your content. Without a compelling headline, even the most comprehensive blog post will go unread. Master the art of headline writing. For example, the writers at BuzzFeed and Upworthy often write upward of twenty different headlines before finally settling on the one that will drive the most traffic, so think carefully about your headline before you hit “publish.”

If you were to ask someone what the difference is between direct and organic website traffic, they would probably be able to warrant a good guess, purely based on the terms’ wording. They might tell you that direct traffic comes from going straight into a website by entering its URL into a browser or clicking a bookmark, while organic traffic comes from finding the site somewhere else, like through a search engine.
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