Great post Ross but I have a question on scaling the work that goes into producing the Kob score: how do you recommend you go about getting the MOZ difficulty score – do you do it manually then VLOOKUP everything or some other way? My current membership at MOZ allows 750 searches a day for KW difficulty so this can be a limiting factor in this research. Would you agree?

For a long time, digital marketers summed up the properties of direct and organic traffic pretty similarly and simply. To most, organic traffic consists of visits from search engines, while direct traffic is made up of visits from people entering your company URL into their browser. This explanation, however, is too simplified and leaves most digital marketers short-handed when it comes to completely understanding and gaining insights from web traffic, especially organic and direct sources.


It may seem a bit overwhelming to think about teaching a course, but boil it down to one simple question: what does your audience want to know? Tackle it from the same angle as any of your articles, comments, or blog content by providing useful and in-depth content that your audience wants. What problems are your audience having? Teach them how to solve them, and as a result of launching an online course, you'll likely begin to field offers and requests for other types of work from home services like coaching, consulting and advising as your audience & authority grow.


Excellent post Brian. I think the point about writing content that appeals to influencers in spot on. Could you recommend some good, manual strategies through which I can spot influencers in boring niches *B2B* where influencers are not really talking much online? Is it a good idea to rely on newspaper articles to a feel for what a particular industry is talking about? Would love to hear your thoughts on that.

What this means is that if someone visits a website and is logged into their Google account, the site owner cannot see the search keywords they used to get there. This has resulted in a great deal of organic traffic being incorrectly marked as direct. The same thing happened to Apple iOS 6 users carrying out Google searches through the Safari browser, after the operating system’s privacy settings were changed, as Search Engine Land reports.
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